You Wonderful You
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Meet GENE KELLY
 [insp - x - x]

He was 1/4 German?


fourmillier:

Gene Kelly
Black Hand, 1950

OMG!

fourmillier:

Gene Kelly

Black Hand, 1950

OMG!


tarntino:

me watching singin’ in the rain: *me watching gene kelly’s ass*


fastenyourseatbelts1900:

Leslie Caron and Gene Kelly in “An American in Paris”

fastenyourseatbelts1900:

Leslie Caron and Gene Kelly in “An American in Paris”


maykelly23:

That’s Entertainment!

maykelly23:

That’s Entertainment!


johnmackbrowns:

Marlon Brando, 1949.


genekellyfans:

Gene, pre-captioned! http://ift.tt/1rjNm9C

OMG!!!

genekellyfans:

Gene, pre-captioned! http://ift.tt/1rjNm9C

OMG!!!


vodkaunicornslincolnlogs:

Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds

vodkaunicornslincolnlogs:

Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds


eugeneskelly:

Gene Kelly demonstrates a dance step to director Vincente Minnelli and actor Hugh Laing for a number in the musical Brigadoon, 1954. 

eugeneskelly:

Gene Kelly demonstrates a dance step to director Vincente Minnelli and actor Hugh Laing for a number in the musical Brigadoon, 1954. 


filmrevues:

Singin’ in the Rain (1952) - dir. Stanley Donen & Gene Kelly

With a grin on their faces, Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds and Gene Kelly do their absolute utmost to warm their way into your heart with elaborate dance numbers, movie props, vaudevillian gags, and just a bit of singin’. It works, to a point. The actual filmmaking is rather rudimentary, even for 1952. Sure, they sort of hint at the magic of film, with the loosely written script revolving around the turnover from silent films to talking pictures, but that magic is achieved in a few entirely disconnected scenes.

Gene Kelly, soaking wet, strutting his stuff in the title number… well, that has to be one of the greatest and most iconic moments in film history. When he hangs off that streetlamp you can’t help but fall in love with him. And when O’Connor beats himself up over the course of “Make ‘em Laugh” you can’t help but fall in love with him. But the driving nature of the film, and the glue that holds these scenes together, seems to be non-existent. It’s a beautiful amalgamation of old showy numbers, superb choreography, and vaudevillian performances. But it’s hardly one of the greatest Hollywood achievements. And maybe Alex DeLarge took some of the magic out of the film for me.

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